Shows for little people: why seeing live music early matters

Artists such as The Wiggles help kids learn how to listen to live music. AAP Image/Tracey Nearmy Liz Giuffre, Macquarie University The mass media invented the teenager during the 1950s and 60s – and thus emerged a whole new audience for popular culture. What we’re seeing now is the recognition of children as an ever more important audience. Musicians and performers, including many on the program at the Sydney Festival, are tailoring their shows to meet the needs of their young fans. Of course adolescence was nothing new back in the 1950s – but teenagers became an identifiable group who were targeted by people selling music, advertising and live performance in a way that they never had been during this time. The follow-on effect has been quite remarkable, with 50s and 60s teenagers – AKA babyboomers – continuing their teenage patterns of music and media consumption. As Andy Bennett and his colleagues have noted of the emerging era of Aging and Popular Music Studies, “in the…
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4 ways to get your kids off the couch these summer holidays

Come school holidays, your school-aged kids are more likely to spend longer on their screens than they do in term time. Here’s how to get them outside and active, with a bit of planning. from www.shutterstock.com Tim Olds, University of South Australia; Amanda Watson, University of South Australia, and Carol Maher, University of South Australia The sun’s shining and there’s a trampoline in the backyard. Yet your kids want to spend their summer holidays lying on the couch playing computer games all day. So what can you do to help your school-aged kids stay active and healthy this summer?   Read more: More than one in four Aussie kids are overweight or obese: we're failing them, and we need a plan Kids put on weight over the holidays In 2016, a US study found that all the increase in fatness of school-aged children occurred over the summer holidays. During term time, kids get leaner and leaner, only to put it all back on, and then some, during the holidays. The…
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Having problems with your kid’s tantrums, bed-wetting or withdrawal? Here’s when to get help

Problems sometimes arise when a child is going through a big change, such as starting school or welcoming a new sibling to the family. Shutterstock Jade Sheen, Deakin University and Elizabeth Westrupp, Deakin University Remember anxiously waiting for your child to take their first steps or speak their first words? It’s exhilarating when they reach a new stage in their development. Every child grows and develops differently. Some will change at a steady pace and amaze us each day with a new skill or word, whereas others appear slow to change before taking a huge developmental leap. These differences make us all unique – but they also make it a challenge to know when the worry is justified and when to seek help.   Read more: What’s in a milestone? Understanding your child’s development A new Australian government initiative may ease parents’ concerns by supporting GPs to better understand infant and childhood development and, particularly, the early signs of me…
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